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Key Facts You Need To Know About Ugadi | Pachadi | New Year ‘s Day

Key Facts You Need To Know About Ugadi | Pachadi | New Year 's Day
Key Facts You Need To Know About Ugadi | Pachadi | New Year ‘s Day

Ugadi day is seen by decorating doors with mango leafs called ‘toranalu’ in Telugu, giving endowments, offering philanthropy to poor people, and sharing an extraordinary sustenance called ‘Ugadi pachadi’, and going to temples.

Ugadi is the New Year’s Day for the Hindus of Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Karnataka state in India.

It is festivity seen in these locales on the very first day of the Hindu lunisolar schedule month of Chaitra.

This normally falls in March or April of the Gregorian calendar.

The day is seen by decorating doors with mango leafs called ‘toranalu’ in Telugu, giving endowments, offering philanthropy to poor people, and sharing an extraordinary sustenance called ‘Ugadi pachadi’, and going to temples.

Devotees perform pujas and seek blessings from God for prosperity, wealth, wellbeing, and success in their respective professions.

 Significance of ‘Ugadi Pachadi’

As part of the process of making ‘Ugadi Pachadi’, there is a mix of six items and each of them has its own significance that symbolizes emotions of life.

Significance of ‘Ugadi Pachadi’
Significance of Ugadi Pachadi

Ugadi festivity likewise incorporates a chronicle perusing out of ‘panchangam’ by the eldest individual from the family or an educated priest, who commonly makes predictions for the forthcoming year.

Jaggery which represents happiness

Green chilli which represents anger

Salt which represents fear

Neem Buds which represents sadness

Tamarind juice which represents disgust

Neem blossoms and tender of mango seed which represents surprise.

Devotees perform pujas and seek blessings from God for prosperity, wealth, wellbeing, and success in their respective professions.

Ugadi has always been imperative and memorable celebration of the Hindus.

Ugadi festivity likewise incorporates a chronicle perusing out of ‘panchangam’ by the eldest individual from the family or an educated priest, who commonly makes predictions for the forthcoming year.

The predictions are made out of the moon signs.

That day is seen as a New Year by Hindus in numerous different parts of India.

For instance, it is called Gudi Padwa in Maharashtra. , however in some cases watched a Gregorian.

In Karnataka, the celebration is commended as Yugadi.

The Sindhis, people from Sindh, celebrate the same day as Cheti Chand, which is the start of their calendar year.

The Hindus of Bali and Indonesia also celebrate their new year on the same day as Nyepi.